NOVEMBER 22, 2014 Tucson Threshold Social

Tucson, Eastside, Threshold Choir member, Pam Ballingham, cordially invited, Joan Brundage, who took training classes with the Music for Healing and Transition Program.
Joan shares her training and experiences and her musical background as applies to ministering to those who are undergoing a transition such as the process of dying, illness or other debilitating trauma.
Two of the many examples  Joan shared were the importance of having an awareness in selecting an appropriate song (tone, rhythm, variation etc.) for the one being sung to.  And she stressed the importance for the singers to prepare themselves emotionally, physically and psychologically before they share in song.
We thank Pam for recognizing Joan’s knowledge and talent and arranging for her to share them with Tucson Threshold Choir in continued conscious giving in song from birthing, in between and to one moving through time.
We thank Joan.
Tanya Fleisher

A Tucson Eastside Threshold Choir Rehearsal Experience

November 11, 2014
In our process to re-learn a song we gathered together sharing our input, those of us with trained musical eyes and ears and those of us with an intuitive sense.
Both have passionate intention of fine tuning the song yet allowing the flow of the nature of the song to occur while giving to the person being sung to the sensitivity and soothing of soul as one moves through time.
Tanya Fleisher

“Responding to Suffering with Compassion”

The week before Christmas, we were privileged to sing once again at a hospice where we regularly do.  Since these visits are not associated with particular singing requests, we often sing softly in the hallways between rooms and ask at each room, after consulting with the staff, if patients or loved ones would like us to enter and sing.  We have found that for us and for the places we support, both requests and this more improvisational style works.

On this visit, after warming up in the lobby and checking in with staff about which rooms might invite music, we went to those identified to introduce ourselves and ask if they wanted singing.  We do not know what we will find when invited into a room.  In what state are the people in the room?  What do they want or need in this moment?  What perspectives do they hold?

The staff suggested a particular room to begin.  When we approached, the two people inside, a mother and daughter, were awake and eager for music.  We asked if they had any holiday requests and based on their responses, we selected several of the more upbeat holiday songs that we had prepared, such as “Jingle Bells” and “Deck the Halls”.  Throughout the year, we sing almost strictly Threshold choir music, but during the holidays, we vary this as holiday music has great meaning for many.  The women sang along with us, creating an atmosphere of impromptu caroling, bringing in the spirit of the season.  After singing about three songs, the daughter thanked us, a usual sign that they release us, that it’s time for us to go.  We thanked them and wished them the best for the holidays.

The next room the staff suggested was just down the hall.  They had heard us singing and warmly invited us in.  There were similarly two women in this room.  However, both were about the same age, perhaps late 50’s, and here was a more somber atmosphere.  After the two women and we briefly settled into the space and asked if they had any requests, we chose “What Child Is This” for them.  Almost immediately, they both began to weep silently.  One of the women, who had sat down on a chair across the room, went to the bedside of the other woman to hold her hand.  We continued to sing as they wept together, holding hands.  When we had finished the song, they thanked us, still with tears in their eyes.  We wished them the best for the holidays, grasping their hands before walking out silently.

Our last two rooms had one woman each.  The first was awake, alert, and sitting up in a chair.  We selected some of the more secular holiday songs, such as “Silver Bells” and “Let It Snow.”  She gratefully listened and seemed to find nostalgia and peace in the songs.  She shared some of her story with us, where she was from, and her extensive music and singing background.  We sang about three pieces, she thanked us with a smile on her face as we departed.  In the last room, we found a comatose woman.  The staff had directed us to her, and we sang “Silent Night” to her very softly before wishing her peaceful journey and exiting.  We asked at a couple more rooms and their tenants kindly declined music.  Finally, we asked the nurse at the nursing station if he would like any music, and he declined, though he and they usually say yes.  Their song is the often the last we sing on our visits.

During rehearsals, we not only practice learning music and singing, but holding space and connecting deeply with each other and with the person or persons for and with whom we sing.  It is not uncommon for us to be met with tears, particularly when singing songs that have particular meaning for people, as many holiday songs do, or one of the Threshold choir songs with their powerful and simple messages.  It is our privilege to carry this vehicle of respite or release, to respond to the suffering we meet or see not with shared suffering, but with compassion.  This is our goal, at least, and we are grateful when we have listened well enough to achieve it together.  Best wishes for a new year full of connection, community, and compassion.

“Where love abides…”

Three of us had the privilege of attending the recent Southwest Threshold Choir Gathering in New Mexico.  Imagine being in a song circle, surrounded by support, lifted by life-affirming music for two full days.  It was a chance to reconnect with members of other choirs in the region whom we had met before, as well as meet new friends.  Amidst our busy lives, it’s easy to become disconnected, from others, from ourselves.

“For it is not merely the trivial which clutters our lives but the important as well.  We can have a surfeit of treasures. . .here. . .I have had space. . . . Here there is time; time to be quiet; time to work without pressure; time to think. . . . Then communication becomes communion and one is nourished as one never is by words.”  (Anne Morrow Lindbergh)

Sometimes we need a retreat, to remember and to renew that reservoir, so we can return and continue to give and receive with a full heart.

“I am learning from this experience.  So it’s not depressing.”  These were the sentiments expressed by a woman we visited who had taken a bad fall in her home.  As she put it, “Last week I was dying, this week, living.”  Although she had hearing difficulties, she was eager to engage in conversation and shared with us some precious wisdom about what she was going through and about her family life and history.  When she couldn’t hear us talk, she encouraged us to write her notes.  While she told us she wouldn’t be able to receive our singing, but was an avid reader, we handed her the lyrics to “Shine” by Joan Chu from the Aromas, CA choir so she could read them.  This seemed to epitomize her positive attitude and how she has lived her life, and she remarked that she approved of the message of the song.  As we left, she encouraged us not to give up, sharing more words of wisdom.  Driving home, the full setting sun broke free of the clouds, lit resplendently in hot pink and orange, shining with a most vibrant and joyous light.

Here is Joan Chu singing “Shine”:

Experiencing unity at our January 10th Rehearsal

We celebrated our first Tucson Threshold choir rehearsal of 2012 catching up on news since our last gathering and taking turns receiving song in the center of our singing circle.  As recommended by our founder Kate Munger, we have a reclining chair that helps us to put ourselves into a receiving state of mind and into a similar position with those for whom we sing who are often in a bed or chair.

The Littleton, MA Threshold choir can be seen rehearsing in this way:

Our member C. is a songwriter, and we’ve had the privilege of debuting one of her pieces (“You Are Love”) in giving and receiving.  When singing to someone in the chair during rehearsal, or at the bedside, we aim for a sense of unity with that person and with each other to express comfort and support through our joined voices.  We all agreed that there was a particular sense of unity that permeated us when singing “You Are Love” this Tuesday, a wonderful beginning to the new year.  We are looking forward to the year ahead with its many possibilities.  Our rehearsals will continue to be the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month from 7:30-9 pm.